1. Submission of Manuscripts

You should send your manuscript to the journal by e-mail: ijadensc@gmail.com

All manuscript should be in Microsoft Word file (*.doc or *.docx).

All manuscripts submit to IJAES are subject to rapid peer review and those of high quality (not previously published and not under consideration for publication in another journal) will be published without delay.

2. Form of Manuscripts

The length limit for each manuscript is no more than 20 galley-proof pages including figures, tables and others. 

All illustrations, photographs, tables, etc., should be integrated into the submitted manuscript, and in a ready to publish style. 

Full name(s) and academic or professional affiliation(s) of the authors and the complete address of the author to whom proofs and correspondence are to be sent should be given.

3. Organization of the Paper

HEADING: The title of the paper should be concise and informative. Successive lines should give the author's name, academic or professional affiliation, and address.

AUTHORS' INFORMATION: Authors should provide the following things when they submit their manuscript: Full name, academic affiliation, full address and E-mail address.

ABSTRACT: Every manuscript must contain a concise abstract, no more than 150 words.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: This section includes acknowledgements of help from associates permission to publish, and financial support.

REFERENCES: See detailed instructions in Section 11.

4. Illustrations

All Illustrations should be submitted in duplicate in a form suitable for reproduction, preferably of such a size that the same degree of reduction (for example 2/3 the original size) can be applied to all of them; they should not exceed 8 by 10 inches. Number the illustrations according to the sequence of their appearance in the text, where they are to be referred to as "Fig. I," "Fig. 2," etc. Each illustration must have a legend. These legends should be typed (double spaced) on a separate page. Prefix each legend with the number of the illustration to which it refers.

Lettering should be done professionally with a Leroy ruler.

Photographs should be glossy prints. The author's name and figure number should be indicated on the back of each illustration.

5. Literature Citations

In the text, references should be indicated in the text by author name(s) followed by date of publication, all in parenthesis, for example (Brown and Allen, 2001) or for a work by more than two authors (Van der Meer et al, 2005). In a list of references put oldest first. At the end of the article references should be listed (unnumbered) ordered alphabetically by author name. Do not use et al here, rather, give the full list of authors. If more than one reference has identical date and authorship use a, b, ... after the date to distinguish, for example (Allen, 2001a).

Further Detailed Examples are given below:

IN-TEXT CITATION:

APA's in-text citations provide at least the author's last name and the year of publication. For direct quotations and some paraphrases, a page number is given as well.

NOTE: APA style requires the use of the past tense or the present perfect tense in signal phrases introducing cited material:

Smith (2005) reported, Smith (2005) has argued.

Basic format for a quotation

Ordinarily, introduce the quotation with a signal phrase that includes the author's last name followed by the year of publication in parentheses. Put the page number (preceded by "p.") in parentheses after the quotation.Critser (2003) noted that despite growing numbers of overweight Americans, many health care providers still "remain either in ignorance or outright denial about the health danger to the poor and the young" (p. 5).

NOTE: APA style requires the year of publication in an in-text citation. Do not include a month, even if the entry in the reference list includes the month.Basic format for a summary or a paraphrase

Include the author's last name and the year either in a signal phrase introducing the material or in parentheses following it. A page number is not required for a summary or a paraphrase, but include one if it would help readers find the passage in a long work. (For the use of other locators, such as paragraph numbers or section names in online sources, see pp. 6-7.)

Yanovski and Yanovski (2002) explained that sibutramine suppresses appetite by blocking the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain (p. 594).

Sibutramine suppresses appetite by blocking the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain (Yanovski & Yanovski, 2002, p. 594).

Work with unknown author

If the author is unknown, mention the work's title in the signal phrase or give the first word or two of the title in the parenthetical citation. Titles of articles and chapters are put in quotation marks; titles of books and reports are italicized. (For online sources with no author, see item 12 on p. 6.)Children struggling to control their weight must also struggle with the pressures of television advertising that, on the one hand, encourages the consumption of junk food and, on the other, celebrates thin celebrities ("Television,"2002).

Authors with the same last name

To avoid confusion, use initials with the last names if your reference list includes two or more authors with the same last name.

Research by E. Smith (1989) revealed that . . .

Two or more works by the same author in the same year

When your list of references includes more than one ("a,""b,"and so on) with the year to order the entries in the reference list. Use those same letters with the year in the in-text citation.

Research by Durgin (2003b) has yielded new findings about the role of counseling in treating childhood obesity.

Two or more works in the same parentheses

When your parenthetical citation names two or more works, put them in the same order that they appear in the reference list, separated with semicolons.

Researchers have indicated that studies of pharmacological treatments for childhood obesity are inconclusive (Berkowitz et al., 2003; McDuffie et al., 2002).

Personal communication

Personal interviews, memos, letters, e-mail, and similar unpublished communications should be cited in the text only, not in the reference list. (Use the first initial with the last name in parentheses.)

One of Atkinson's colleagues, who has studied the effect of the media on children's eating habits, has contended that advertisers for snack foods will need to design ads responsibly for their younger viewers (F. Johnson, personal communication, October 20, 2009 ).

Electronic source

When possible, cite electronic sources, including online sources, as you would any other source, giving the author and the year.

Atkinson (2001) found that children who spent at least four hours a day watching TV were less likely to engage in adequate physical activity during the week.

Unknown author

If no author is named, mention the title of the source in the signal phrase or give the first word or two of the title in the parentheses.

The body's basal metabolic rate, or BMR, is a measure of its at-rest energy requirement ("Exercise,"2003).

Unknown date

When the date is unknown, use the abbreviation "n.d."(for"no date").

Attempts to establish a definitive link between television programming and children's eating habits have been problematic (Magnus, n.d.).

No page numbers APA ordinarily requires page numbers for quotations, and it recommends them for summaries and paraphrases from long sources. When an electronic source lacks stable numbered pages, your citation should include information that will help readers locate the particular passage being cited.

NOTE: Electronic files in portable document format (PDF) often have stable page numbers. For such sources, give the page number in the parenthetical citation.

Indirect source

If you use a source that was cited in another source (a secondary source), name the original source in your signal phrase. List the secondary source in your reference list and include it in your parenthetical citation, preceded by the words "as cited in". In the following example, Satcher is the original source, and Critser is the secondary source, given in the reference list.

Former surgeon general Dr. David Satcher described "a nation of young people seriously at risk of starting out obese and dooming themselves to the difficult task of overcoming a tough illness"(as cited in Critser, 2003, p. 4).

6. Tables

Tables should be typed on separate pages, and numbered with Roman numerals according to their sequence in the text. Column headings should be short and self-explanatory. A brief title should be given above each table, and any footnotes below (see Section 8).

7. Headings

The following sequence of headings should be used: Capitals at the margin, italics at the margin italics at the margin indented, italics in the line. If further subdivision is needed below the level of the fourth heading, use (1), (2), etc., and (a), (b), etc.

8. Footnotes

In the text, footnotes should be used only when essential. They should be consecutively numbered throughout with superscript Arabic numerals. The texts of the footnotes should be gathered on a separate page at the end of the manuscript.

In tables, footnotes are usually preferable to long explanations in the headings or body of the table. They should be placed under the table and indicated by superscript lower case italic letters.

9. Symbols and Abbreviations

Please use widely accepted symbols and forms of abbreviation. If there is any doubt in your mind about a particular symbol or abbreviation, give the full expression followed by the abbreviation, when it appears in the text for the first time.

10. Mathematics

Mathematical expressions and equations should be typewritten whenever possible, with all symbols aligned as they are to appear in print. If longhand must be used, great care must be given to legibility. Greek letters and other special symbols must be identified in the left-hand margin the first time they appear. Also, distinguish carefully between one and ell, zero and upper and lower case oh, letter and Greek tau, plus sign and dagger, etc.

Vectors will be set in bold face and should be indicated in the manuscript by underlining with a wavy line.

Equations should be numbered serially on the right-hand side by Arabic numerals in parentheses. Only equations explicitly referred to in the text should be numbered.

11. References

References should be indicated in the text by author name(s) followed by date of publication, all in parenthesis, for example (Brown and Allen, 2001) or for a work by more than two authors (Van der Meer et al, 2005). In a list of references put oldest first. At the end of the article references should be listed (unnumbered) ordered alphabetically by author name. Do not use et al here, rather, give the full list of authors. If more than one reference has identical date and authorship use a, b, ... after the date to distinguish, for example (Allen, 2001a).
Please adopt the following style for listing references:
Journals:
Lang D C, Monefeldt C and Rosenhead J V (2000). Looking in the wrong place for healthcare improvements: A system dynamics study of an accident and emergency department. Journal of Applied Modeling 51: 518-531.
Books:
Glover F and Laguna M (1997). Tabu Search. Kluwer Academic Publishers: London .
Papers in a contributed volume:
Osman IH (1995). An introduction to meta-heuristics. In: Lawrence M and Wilsdon C (eds). Operational Research Tutorial 1995. Operational Research Society: Birmingham , pp 92-122.
Unpublished reports and theses (which should be available on request):
Mourtos I (2003). Integer and constraint programming methods for mutually orthogonal latin squares. PhD thesis, University of London .
Internet sites:
References to internet sites should be quoted in the normal way in the text e.g. Williams (2006). In the reference list the full URL must be given, followed by the date that the website was accessed.
Example:
George V and Vaughn R (2003). Application of Lightweight Formal Methods in Recruitment Engineering. http://www.stsc.hill.af.mil/crosstalk/2003/01/George.html, accessed 15 August 2006 .

Citations at a glance:

Citation at a glance Article in a periodical (APA)

To cite an article in a print periodical in APA style, include the

following elements:

1 Author

2 Year of publication

3 Title of article

4 Name of periodical

5 Volume number; issue number, if required

6 Page numbers of article

Citation at a glance | Book (APA)

To cite a print book in APA style, include the following elements:

1 Author

2 Year of publication

3 Title and subtitle

4 Place of publication

5 Publisher

Citation at a glance | Article from a database (APA)

To cite an article from a database in APA style, include the following elements:

1 Author(s)

2 Date of publication

3 Title of article

4 Name of periodical

5 Volume number; issue number, if required

6 Page range

7 DOI (digital object identifier)

8 URL for journal's home page (if there is no DOI)

Citation at a glance | Section in a Web document (APA)

To cite a section in a Web document in APA style, include the following elements:

1 Author

2 Date of publication or most recent update

3 Title of section

4 Title of document

5 URL of section